7 Content Curation Tools for your Social Media Marketing Strategy Part 1

7 Content Curation Tools

7 Content Curation Tools for your Social Media Marketing Strategy

Part 1 – Working with Feedly and Pocket

Content curation is the practice of finding valuable content and sharing it with your social media followers. For instance, a local Noblesville restaurant might want to share a great review of a California Cab that the restaurant happens to serve. Or a Fisher’s clothing store might want to share a press release of the new spring lineup for one of the clothing brands it carries. Or perhaps that clothing store could share an article on the benefits of freezing jeans versus washing them. The idea is to share content (articles, videos, pictures) that you think you’re followers will find value in and to establish yourself as a thought leader in your business’s industry. But how do you find that content and how do you share it quickly and easily with your social media followers? I give you 7 content curation tools that will save you time, establish yourself as a thought leader in your business, grow your following, and keep your business top of mind for the services and/or products you sell.

1. Build a Content Feed with Feedly

You could spend half a day checking blogs, doing Google searches, and reading news sites for valuable content that you could share with your social media followers. Even if you bookmarked your favorite sites and sorted them into corresponding folders, it would still take a lot of time to go through each one to catch up on the latest stories and posts. That is why I recommend Feedly. Feedly is an RSS-type reader that is really easy to set up and has a great mobile app which is important when I look at digital marketing tools. Before Feedly, I use to use Google Reader which was great and very popular but is not around anymore. There are similar tools to Feedly, but it seems to be the most popular. You simply create folders on Feedly and add URL addresses of pages or sites that you want to see the latest stories and posts from. You can also add RSS feeds if the site has one. And there is also a “Discover” option that lets you add popular sites in popular categories.

From Feedly, you can quickly browse the headlines and read the stories you want to read right on the app. You can also quickly share the content via Twitter, Facebook, and other popular social media channels. You can also save the content for later and add tags to the content for easier sorting. You can flip through the latest content or you can flip through content in a folder you’ve created. I usually flip through the latest content and when I see something that I might want to share or read later, I could save the content on Feedly but I save it to Pocket which is my next important tool for content curation.

2. Save Content with Pocket

I love the Pocket app as a reader for my phone. It is an offline reader which means that it will save the content on your phone allowing you to read the content without needing a wifi or cell signal to load the story. This is great for people who commute on the subway or for those wanting to lower their data and battery usage.

I save all the content from Feedly that I want to read for later or to share with Pocket. Both apps work very well together. When I am on Feedly, I can simply hold down my finger on a story and it will save to Pocket or I can simply hit the Pocket icon on Feedly and it saves it just like that.

Pocket has lots of options allowing users to customize and use it the way that works best for them. For me, I primarily read the content in the My List section which is all the content I saved. Pocket does save the content according to content types like articles, videos, and images and you can view the content by type. You can also add tags to the content in case you want to sort the content by the client or subject matter. There is also a favorite section where you can save the best content. Pocket has also added a ‘Recommended’ section which serves you content from other Pocket users who have “recommended” content that is similar to the content that you save.

When you click on the content, it opens it up for you to read or look at. From there you can “recommend” the content which then shares it with other Pocket users or you can share it via social media channels, messaging and email. While I could share it directly using the Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn apps, I usually use Buffer to share my content. In Part 2 of 7 Content Curation Tools for your Social Media Marketing Strategy, I will dive into Buffer, bit.ly, Google Alerts, and other tools I find valuable for content curation.

About the Author

Aaron Whitaker